Essay On How To Kill A Mockingbird

Below you will find five outstanding thesis statements / paper topics on “To Kill a Mockingbird” that can be used as essay starters. All five incorporate at least one of the themes found in “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee and are broad enough so that it will be easy to find textual support, yet narrow enough to provide a focused clear thesis statement. These thesis statements for “To Kill a Mockingbird” offer a short summary of different elements that could be important in an essay but you are free to add your own analysis and understanding of the plot or themes to them. Using the essay topics below in conjunction with the list of important quotes from To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, you should have no trouble connecting with the text and writing an excellent essay.>

*Note: Additional Quotes from this and other books can be found easily in books online *

Thesis Statement / Essay Topic #1: Notions of Justice and Fairness in “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee

Despite the unwavering dedication of Atticus Finch in “To Kill a Mockingbird”, the absence of evidence, and a moving courtroom speech, Tom Robinson is convicted of a crime that he did not commit. This jury ruling causes both those who advocated Robinson’s conviction and those who were convinced of his innocence to question their notions of justice and fairness. As if a false conviction was not enough, Tom is eventually killed, and the sense of justice and fairness seem to be completely violated. Write an argumentative essay on “To Kill a Mockingbird” in which you establish what Lee is trying to convey regarding these two concepts that are so important to civil society. Questions that you might want to consider include: If justice and fairness are so elusive, how can Atticus and Scout continue to believe in them?, and Are justice and fairness conflicting concepts in “To Kill a Mockingbird”?

Thesis Statement / Essay Topic #2: The Various Forms of Discrimination in To Kill a Mockingbird

The most obvious form of discrimination in To Kill a Mockingbird is racism; however, there are other types of prejudice and discrimination that typify relationships among the novel’s characters. Scout, for example, is ridiculed in “To Kill a Mockingbird” because she is a tomboy. Boo Radley is ostracized despite the fact that hardly anyone knows him. Reverse racism is also present in the novel, as evidenced by the threats against Atticus Finch and his family as he defends Tom Robinson. Take one or more of the forms of discrimination in To Kill a Mockingbird and write an analytic essay in which you explain the forms and, if applicable, compare and contrast the types of discrimination. You should argue whether the lessons about discrimination that Scout learns are applicable to all types of prejudice, or whether they apply to racism alone.

Thesis Statement / Essay Topic #3: The Moral Development of Scout and Jem in “To Kill a Mockingbird”

Scout and her brother Jem are both children of the morally passionate lawyer, Atticus Finch, and both are exposed to the same experiences that shape their sense of right and wrong. Yet Scout and Jem come to dramatically different conclusions about good and evil and the essential nature of humankind. Write an expository essay on “To Kill a Mockingbird” in which you develop an understanding of how Scout and Jem arrive at such disparate concepts of the world. Be sure to consider not only the final worldview at which each arrives, but to look at the novel as a whole and identify how their belief systems develop. Include relevant quotations that demonstrate how, despite their shared experiences, Scout and Jem begin to part ways, philosophically speaking, early in the novel.

Thesis Statement / Essay Topic #4 The Role of Place in To Kill a Mockingbird

The town of Maycomb is described in great detail in “To Kill a Mockingbird”, so much so that the reader gets the sense that Maycomb is more than a setting; it takes on the weight and importance of a character. Write an expository or persuasive essay on “To Kill a Mockingbird” in which you describe Maycomb and explain its significance with respect to the events and meaning of the novel. Be sure to dig beneath the surface: it’s easy to say that Maycomb is a Southern town and that certain social dynamics—such as racism—shape the characters and their circumstances, but there are also more subtle characteristics about the town that exert influence over the novel’s outcome. Finally, consider whether Maycomb is changed by the conclusion. It shapes people and events, but it is also shaped by its inhabitants and their actions.

Thesis Statement/Essay Topic #5: Character Analysis of Atticus Finch

One of the most inspiring characters in 20th century American literature is Atticus Finch. A morally upright lawyer, a committed and loving father, and an overall good citizen, Finch is regarded highly by most citizens with a sense of justice. Write an essay in which you analyze Atticus Finch’s character. You may wish to focus the content of your essay by selecting a single quote or passage (consider a portion of the courtroom speech, for instance) and explaining how it reflects Finch’s character strengths. Address whether Finch has any flaws, and explain how he conveys his beliefs to his children and his community.

* For an outstanding essay/article analyzing the character of Atticus Finch,click here *

+ All To Kill A Mockingbird Essays:

  • Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird
  • Justice System in To Kill a Mockingbird
  • Study of Families in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Children Who Kill
  • Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird
  • Social Classes in Maycomb, to Kill a Mockingbird
  • Prejudice in To Kill A Mocking Bird
  • Racism in To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • To Kill a Mockingbird Essay Questions/Answers
  • To Kill A Mockingbird: Analysis of Atticus
  • Stereotypes and Discrimination in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird
  • No-Kill Shelters Rehabilitation for Animals
  • Racial Prejudice in the Bluest Eye and to Kill a Mockingbird
  • Use of Symbols in To Kill a Mockingbird
  • Atticus Finch in To Kill A Mocking Bird is an Accommodator Not an Activist
  • Us of Symbols in To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • To Kill a Mocking Bird Reflection
  • The Story of an Hour/the Joy That Kills
  • Is Atticus a Good Father in To Kill a Mockingbird?
  • Racial Prejudice in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Atticus the Hero in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird
  • The Significance of the Title of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Critical Lens "Fear Is Simply the Consequence of Every Lie"
  • Themes of Courage, Prejudice, and Maturity in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird
  • Why is the Novel Called To Kill a Mockingbird?
  • Oswald Didn't Kill Kennedy
  • Influence of Stereotypes in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Smoking Will Kill You Softly
  • Scout's Childhood Simplicity in Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird
  • A Rose for Emily: Why Ms. Emily Did Not Kill Homer Barron
  • Parental Roles in to Kill a Mockingbird: Calpurnia
  • To Kill A Mockingbird: Understanding Prejudice in Our Lives
  • Interracial Relationships in To Kill a Mockingbird
  • To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • The Narrator Debate: To Kill A Mockingbird
  • The Trial in To Kill a Mocking Bird
  • Boo is a Crazy Maniac in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • To Kill a Mockingbird: Character Analysis of Jem and Scout
  • The Mockingbird Theme in To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee
  • Scottsboro Trial: The Real Trial of Tom Robinson in To Kill a Mockingbird
  • Mockingbird
  • Examine How Lee Presents the Character of Atticus in to Kill a Mockingbird
  • To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Prejudice in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Examples of Prejudice in To Kill a Mocking Bird by Harper Lee
  • Animal Shelters and the No Kill Movement
  • "To Kill a Mockingbird" Metaphor Analysis: It is a Sin to Kill Tom Robinson
  • Southern Prejudice in Harper Lee´s To Kill a Mockingbird
  • The Grapes of Wrath, by John Steinbeck and To Kill A Mockingbird, by Harper Lee
  • Racism Kills Thoughts in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Stereotyped Characters in To Kill a Mockingbird
  • Misconceptions about Human Behavior in To Kill a Mockingbird
  • Guns Kill vs. People Kill
  • Use of Minor Characters in To Kill a Mockingbird
  • Sexism, Prejudice, and Racism in Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird
  • To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • What Doesn't Kill You Makes You Stronger
  • To Kill a Mocking Bird Chapter Summaries
  • The Significance of the Title To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Racist Society in Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird
  • How Harper Lee explores the theme of prejudice in the novel To kill
  • To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Mythology and Archetypes in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird
  • Social Values in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • The Solution to Stereotypes in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Comparing the Movies A Time to Kill, by John Grisham and To Kill a Mockingbird
  • Analysing Harper Lee and his Characters in To Kill a Mockingbird
  • Social Forces in to Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Literature Adds To Reality
  • The Positive Impact of Atticus, Calpurnia and Aunt Alexandra on Scout in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird
  • To Kill a Mockingbird: The Book vs. The Movie
  • Innocents in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird: Scout's Childhood Innocence and Growing Maturity
  • Film Scene Analysis: The Crazy 88s from 'Kill Bill Vol 1'
  • Atticus as a Hero, in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird
  • Maycomb Society in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Learning from Experience in To Kill a Mockingbird
  • Jem´s Maturity in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Feature Article Racism- to Kill a Mockingbird Etc

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